Posts tagged exercise
The 10 Best Gifts for New Moms
 
You can't pour from an empty cup.png
 

Finding the best gift for a new mom should be a relatively easy task, however if you find yourself looking for the perfect gift for the new mom in your life, you may find that most new mom gifts are actually geared towards the baby, not the mother. At Duo Diary, our postpartum wellness journals are designed with mom in mind. We know that moms need to take care of themselves first, but somehow, this notion is still an afterthought. That's why Duo Diary is much more than just a baby feeding diary - there’s a page for baby….and a page for mom.

The ‘page for mom’ is missing in almost all postpartum products, which are mostly primarily baby focused. Mom is completely missing from the equation. Giving moms permission, access & tools to take care of herself is basically revolutionary at this point. So, we want to highlight other ‘revolutionary’ products that would make the best gifts for a new mom after she brings home a baby.

 

The 10 Best Gifts for New Moms

1. Postpartum Exercise Membership

There are a few women-led companies out there that are focused solely on helping women regain function after childbirth so that they can get back to their normal activities in a safe way. The catch is that most new mamas don't even know companies like this exist, so gifting a new mom with a membership (all programs are online and done at home) to one or more of these companies is a great way to ease her back.

Restore Your Core

Mutu System

Momma Strong

Abs, Core and Pelvic Floor by Natalie Hodson

 

2. Motherbees

An LA-based company, Motherbees offers LA- local food delivery focusing on foods for healing from childbirth like soups, teas, recovery and more. And for those who aren't local to LA, Motherbees founder Heng Ou wrote "The First Forty Days: The Essential Art of Nourishing the New Mother" filled with recipes and traditions and "the lost art of caring for a mother after birth" (available on Amazon).

 

3. Postpartum Subscription Boxes

Since subscription boxes are a thing these days, we're happy to see that some companies are taking 'pregnancy' subscription boxes into the 4th trimester. Many companies now offer boxes JUST for a new mom:

Alively

The Stork Bag

Ecocentric Mom

Bump Boxes

NaturAli

 

4. Mama Glow Glow Time Collection by Good Medicine Beauty Lab

New moms are often concerned about what they eat, but did you know that what you put ON your body is important, too? Aside from feeling incredibly luxurious and decadent, this line at Good Medicine Beauty lab was created just for mamas, and is safe for pregnant & nursing women.

 

5. Bone Broth Herbs

There's a reason the Motherbees book (#2 on this list) has lots of broth recipes- bone broth is warming, feels nurturing, grounding, and calming at a time when a new mother needs it most. Urban Herbs is upping the bone broth game through their Nourish The Mama herbs that can be added to bone broth, using a blend of Chinese herbs thought to help women recover from childbirth. Make sure you check with your healthcare practitioner/doctor before using these herbs. (And if you gift this to a mama, please, make the broth for her!)

 

6. Meal Delivery Service

Nourishment is so important for new moms, but making a healthy meal is damn near impossible when you have a newborn. Enter meal delivery services. Getting a new mom a gift card to any meal delivery service (NOT meal kits which require the mom to actually do the cooking) can often be EXACTLY what a new mama needs. Yes, you could just bake a lasagna, but lasagna isn't healthy or nourishing and many meal delivery services offer options for dietary restrictions and meals that can be truly healthy for a new mom. Try using The Google Machine to find local deliver services in your area that cater to moms (like Motherbees in LA or MaMeal in Chicago). Otherwise, consider gift cards to Doordash, Grub Hub, or Munchery.

7. Earth Mama Organics Postpartum Line

We love seeing companies that create products just for mom, and Earth Mama is a well known company that makes natural and organic products. While they have a large line of products for baby and pregnancy, they also have a postpartum line, made just for the new mama. 

 

8. Postpartum Doula

A new mom needs help, in any form, of any kind. Wondering what kind of gift to get a new mom? Consider gifting a gift card or certificate to a local postpartum doula, whose role is to help support the whole family's transition- not just focusing on baby. They may do a range of tasks from light housekeeping, meal prep, baby support, lactation support, to help with siblings. Find one in your area here

 

9. Postpartum Kits

Etsy is full of creative kits made with products to help soothe and nurture a new mom. You can find a plethora by simply searching for "postpartum" in Etsy, but here are a few:

SweetGum Botanicals

Plainville Homestead

Green Earth Naturals

 

10. Duo Diary Postpartum Journal

There are a million apps and baby journals out there that help new parents track all of their baby's feedings and diapers, but none of them take mom into account. Duo Diary knows how intimately intertwined mama and baby are, and we also know how common it is for new moms to lose track of her own health while she adjusts to focusing so much on baby. That's why our journals are designed with ample space for new moms to make sure they are healing OK, that they are getting the care they need, that they are eating, sleeping, drinking water, and other basic needs that seem to go out the window for new moms (showers, anyone?). We also offer an entire Resources area just to help mothers navigate the postpartum period and our blog is full of information like exercise for new moms, healing after childbirth, and interviews with cutting edge mama focused companies like Mothering Arts and Birthfit. You can buy our journals in the original one month journal or our new 3 month journal or 1 year pack. Go here to purchase one for the new mom in your life.

 

What are your favorite gifts to give a new mom? 


This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about med­i­cine, health and related sub­jects.  The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed physi­cian or other health care worker.

This post may contain affiliate links.

An Interview With: BIRTHFIT

Here at Duo Diary, we are all about providing new mothers with tools and resources to make healing after childbirth easier. Information about HOW to heal shouldn't be hard to access -and let's face it, most women don't even realize they NEED to heal. There are so many questions women have after having a baby: breastfeeding and pumping tips, pubic symphysis symptoms, diastasis recti,  self care ideas for new moms, what exercises are best for postpartum women. While many women have these questions and so many more- there is not nearly enough information readily available at the fingertips of new moms. We aim to help change that by highlighting companies whose purpose is rooted in helping pregnant and/or postpartum women. This month, we are SUPER excited to be sharing BIRTHFIT- a company focused on helping moms get and stay strong using their four pillars: Fitness, Nutrition, Chiropractic, and Mindset. BIRTHFIT has many online programs, as well as access to Regional Directors across the country, so that you can access the BIRTHFIT knowledge no matter where you live.  We recently chatted with BIRTHFIT to find out more about what they do and how they can help women like you. Read more about BIRTHFIT below:

Explain what Birthfit is and why it was started:

BIRTHFIT is an educated, empowered state of readiness - specific to childbirth - that is achieved through an evolved practice in fitness, nutrition, chiropractic, and mindset.  BIRTHFIT is a movement that was created to change the way the world views birth.  Our goal is to cultivate awareness and enhance education through the Motherhood Transition by developing and producing one of a kind BIRTHFIT experiences through in-person classes and distance learning so that women have the space to make their own informed, intuitively guided choices.  

What types of women/situations do you work with most frequently? What usually brings a client to you?:

Women come to us when they decide that they want to experience an empowered, educated Motherhood Transition.  Anywhere between preconception through any point postpartum, the transition into motherhood deserves attention as well as intention.  We see women throughout this transitional time period typically because they want guidance on movements during pregnancy, details on core and pelvic floor health, or are looking for a total approach to taking care of themselves as they grow and nurture other humans.  We typically see women because others have told them about BIRTHFIT, and we love those referrals. 

What are some examples of programs or services that you offer?:

We offer courses in person as well as online.  We work with women in person through our various BIRTHFIT Regional Directors, who offer the BIRTHFIT Prenatal Series (a childbirth education course), BIRTHFIT Postpartum Series Breath & Flow and BIRTHFIT Postpartum Series (unique group rehabilitation courses), consultations, prenatal training, and community events; we also work with coaches and professionals to introduce them to BIRTHFIT at our seminars.  This year we're opening up the annual BIRTHFIT Summit for a one day community event as well!  We offer online support through programs such as Before the Bump, Prenatal Programming, and Postpartum Programming; as well as consultations with our team and webinars on various topics.  We have a ton of free content via our blogs, webinars, podcast, and YouTube channel.  

What are some of the most common misconceptions that you see about postpartum recovery and exercise in pregnancy/postpartum?:

There are so many misconceptions.  Essentially, society has everything backwards: we think of pregnancy as a fragile state and postpartum as the "bounce back" time.  In reality, pregnancy is the ultimate expression of female fitness and the postpartum period is when women need extra care, support, and patience.  Pregnant women are incredibly capable, and their exercise routines can reflect that in an intentional way.  Melissa Hemphill (the BIRTHFIT Coach lead) likens activities during pregnancy to putting a fork in a microwave: just because you *can* do something doesn't mean it's a good idea.  But we don't modify movements for pregnant women; instead, we train intentionally with the pregnant body in mind.  Our workouts aren't just about moving around with a bump: we train to prepare for labor and to enhance core stability throughout pregnancy.  

On the postpartum side, there's this idea about some magical six-week green light.  Research tells us that ligaments take approximately 280 days to heal, and there are plenty of ligamentous changes that happen during pregnancy; to only take six weeks to allow your body to recover is crazy!  But unfortunately, a lot of women are instructed to suck in their belly in order to strengthen their core or heal a diastasis, when this couldn't be further from the truth.  We teach core stability based on the principles of Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization and the developmental kinesiology of how all humans learn to move.  Sucking in, pulling the belly button to the spine, and other similar cues are all the opposite of how humans stabilize appropriately.  (I suppose a succinct answer to your question would be "everything"!)

What do you wish women knew about postpartum recovery?:

I wish more women knew how important it is to recover completely.  I wish they knew that chiropractic care and pelvic floor physical therapy are essential and I wish that these appointments were as automatic as the six-week postpartum check-up that women go to their OB or midwife for.  

We divide the postpartum period into four phases: 

0-2 weeks is the co-regulation period

2-6 weeks is the recovery period

6-12 weeks is the rehabilitation period

12 weeks-12 months is the rebuilding period

That's a year worth of intentional recovery that we emphasize.  Many women expect to be "normal" within six weeks, and don't have the guidance or information from their support system to expect otherwise.  We're doing ourselves a disservice by not taking the time to heal, reset, and nourish our bodies in the postpartum time period.  

What have you learned from the women you've worked with?:

Every single woman that we encounter has something to teach us.  The most valuable lesson I've learned is to simply be patient and allow moms to express themselves how/when they're comfortable.  Some women need and want to share things immediately, while others need some time and space to reflect before diving in.  I think the most valuable lesson I've learned has been getting rid of "shoulds" in the Motherhood Transition.  Each woman is on her own journey, and we're just here to support them through that. 

How would you like to see pregnancy & postpartum care change in the US?:

In a word: drastically.  Like I said, we have things reversed.  I would love to see pregnant women celebrated for their incredible vitality and life-giving capabilities.  I would love to see postpartum women nurtured and supported by their communities, providers, and society in general.  I see this happening through education, and we're already noticing the differences within our communities where BIRTHFIT is represented.  We are working on uniting birth practitioners in the BIRTHFIT Professional Seminar so that there isn't such a disconnect.  We've brought OBs, PTs, and DCs together with nutritionists, doulas, coaches, and childbirth educators; together we're changing the way that women receive care throughout the Motherhood Transition. 

Where can our readers find out more about Birthfit?:

We love connecting with people!  Ideally, we'd meet women through our Regional Directors (there are almost 100 of us!).  You can find a BIRTHFIT Regional Director near you at www.BIRTHFIT.com.  There you can also look for a BIRTHFIT Professional or BIRTHFIT Coach to work with.  You can sign up for our online programs, subscribe to our newsletter, read up on our blog, watch our free webinars, or hop over to the BIRTHFIT Podcast!  And, of course, you can follow us on social media @BIRTHFIT!  We would love to connect with you soon! 

 

This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about med­i­cine, health and related sub­jects.  The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed physi­cian or other health care worker.

This post may contain affiliate links.

10 Self Care Ideas For Busy Moms
 
Photo by  Dominik Martin  on  Unsplash
 

Self care is such a buzz word at the moment, which isn't a bad thing- its about time something that revolves around stress relief and taking care of yourself is a 'thing.'  But sometimes, self care ideas either don't serve us in a positive way, or they are unattainable or unrealistic. And while we all love a good glass of wine and a nice warm bath, not all self  care looks like a Pinterest photo. It can take many forms- from recognizing your worth to demanding better to taking a break- it's all important to our overall mental health and wellbeing. 

As mamas, self care is incredibly important. So here are ten tips that can have big affects on your wellbeing - a self care plan for the modern mama.

1. Say NO

For whatever reason, women are socialized to be people pleasers. An act of self care is to start training yourself to say no to others in the interest of serving yourself.  Bottom line, start making room in your schedule for you, not for others. 

2. Go to bed early and on a schedule

Research shows that an early and consistent bedtime and wake time have profound affects on our health. Consistent good sleep habits affect emotional health, problem solving, irritability, productivity, weight, and many other chronic and serious health conditions. The common knowledge is that our circadian rhythms dictate a 10pm-6am window as optimal, but some sleep scientists say genetics plays a big role, as does age. So play around with times and find what works for you. 

3. Demand more from your partner. 

Like "self care", "emotional labor"  or "mental load" are current big buzz words that have gained a lot of traction this year. And with good reason - new research shows it is oh so real and has a measurable affects on women. This one is hard, because it is one of the most important on this list, but that also means it's one of the most difficult to implement or change. The bottom line is that as a mom, you are now taking on significantly more, and these responsibilities (both actual and mental load-type of responsibilities) should be shared as much as possible. Every family is different and dynamics play a huge role but consider some small steps you might be able to take to start sharing this load with your partner in a more equal way. That may mean having some difficult conversations, but this is your health, and sometimes difficult conversations can lead to big changes. 

4. TAKE time for yourself.

Ever notice how some people just seem to have boundaries set firmly in place for themselves, they don't seem to be beholden to anyone else's expectations, and they just take time they want or need? Be like them. Unapologetically take time for yourself. Don't ask permission from your partner, don't make sure all your ducks are in a row first, just go and take some time. This might start off with leaving the room for 15 minutes to read a magazine article or something. You shouldn't need permission to take a break. Just freaking take it. 

5. Turn off screens an hour before bed.

This goes back to #2. Those blue lights our phones and ipads and TV's emit? They are oh-so-bad for our sleep - not to mention the anxiety created from scrolling through the latest political news on Facebook. Turn screens off an hour before bed to give your brain a chance to chill out before hitting the pillow and do something old fashioned like reading a book. With pages. 

6. Exercise for your mood

This means listen to your body, not your exercise calendar. Are you having an extra busy week? Not sleeping great? Fighting a cold? This might not be the best time to go out and do that 5 mile run that's on your calendar. This also depends on where you are in your menstrual cycle. Try using the Flo Living myFlo app to track your periods - this app also tells you how your hormones at different times in your cycle affect exercise. 

7. Drink a lot of water

Dehydration is super common, especially for moms who are pulled in a million different directions throughout the day. But it can have real and immediate consequences like fatigue, hunger, and sluggishness. Hydrating throughout the day is key- carry a water bottle (preferably glass or stainless steel) and keep track of how much you are drinking in your Duo Diary to make sure you are getting enough- particularly if you are breastfeeding!

8. Get off Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, or your social media drug of choice

There is some research suggesting that social media usage may lead to less happiness and life satisfaction. But you already knew that. So don't bother reading Great Uncle Earl's latest political diatribe or the 'my life is perfect' post from that person from high school you haven't talked to since high school. Cutting out social media is harder than it sounds- the research also suggests that it can show addictive qualities - so try weaning yourself off, or going cold turkey on a 'digital cleanse.' 

9. Stand Up For Yourself and Your Health

As mamas, particularly when you are a new mama, you come into contact with LOTS of people who have you and your child's best interest at heart, but whose advice may not really serve you in the best way possible (such as the common "you just had a baby, this is normal" advice). If something doesn't sound right, feel right, or most importantly- resolve your issue or give you an answer- keep demanding more. This goes for any healthcare practitioner you come into contact with after having a baby! They see a ton of people and are overwhelmed, (we can all relate to the 'rushed doctor appointment') so you'll need to demand more if you aren't getting the information you need to be healthy. 

10. Journal

The health benefits of journaling are well documented, and a little can go a long way. No, you may no longer have 30 minutes of uninterrupted writing as a mom, but even just jotting down the one nagging thought that's bugging you can help. This is why Duo Diary is designed with a big ol' notes section on the page for mamas- journaling for yourself is part of your health. So grab your Duo Diary and get writing!

 

The Story Behind Morskap- A Postpartum Health Site
 
woman looking out.jpg
 

By guest blogger Yana, creator of Morskap, A Postpartum Health Site. You can find out more by visiting morskap.com

In the course of incubating a new human, I discovered a sea of helpful (though not ideal) resources on how to become pregnant, surviving pregnancy and labor, and taking care of a new human who is limited to a binary means of communication (to cry, or not to cry, that is the question). What I felt missing was a resource specifically focused on postpartum recovery.

Having gone through the biggest bodily and emotional change of my life, I had lots of questions:

  • How long before I heal given my mode of delivery?

  • What exercise can I do in the meantime?

  • What special postpartum exercises (kegels?) should I do and when? Are there helpful equipment for that?

  • Which things will never go back to normal?

  • What’s the most flattering and comfortable clothes to cover this beast in?

  • Is it normal to feel [choose your own adventure]? Is it normal to still feel that? How about now?

  • OMG breastfeeding! So painful and everyone talks about it as if it’s wonderful and beautiful. Can I skip it? Is it taboo to even ask?

  • How do you best split parenting responsibilities with my partner?

  • What are some things to think about when going back to work?

  • What emotions to expect around all of the above issues?

Some of these questions I’ve talked with other moms about, but I found that the answers varied based on things like preexisting health, how each pregnancy and labor went, the personality of the mom, her partner, and the baby. I live in a city where women often don’t have children until they feel like they are in a good place in their careers. So my network of moms wasn’t large enough to cover each possible scenario. Some things I just wasn’t comfortable discussing in person. In the beginning, I didn’t feel like talking with anyone. I felt like I didn’t have the time to do it. Searching for answers online seemed like a good idea, but it turned out to be too time consuming. There was sooo much noise!

So I created a consolidated resource for questions around being a new mom: morskap.com. This resource explains why new moms may be sweating a lot at night, why running may not be a great idea if experiencing pelvic pressure, and lots of other things that I and some of my friends were curious about after birth. I thought that it may be helpful to other moms that don’t have the time or inclination to search for the best answers. New moms are grappling with caring for a little one, possibly trying to go back to work, and generally staying optimistic (remember: every fifth mom suffers from postpartum depression!).

Hope you find Morskap helpful and feel free to reach out to me at yana@morskap.com if you have feedback.

How to Get Your Body Back After Having A Baby
 
Get Back in Shape After Baby
 
This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about med­i­cine, health and related sub­jects.  The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed physi­cian or other health care worker.

If you Google, "how to get your body back after having a baby" you'll get a whopping 13,700,000 results. "Do this exercise to shed pounds!" "Eat this or don't eat that to get back to your pre-baby weight!"

Most likely, very few of these results will say "how to heal your body after childbirth" or "do these exercises to regain pre-baby function!"

Look, wanting to get back to your pre-baby weight is a real and valid concern. Women want and need to feel like themselves again after the life-changing upheaval of having a baby.

But what if, instead of revering celebrities who walked a runway 8 weeks after birth, we focused on allowing a woman to heal, then start exercising in a way that's appropriate for whatever hand she was dealt in childbirth so that ultimately, she can be even stronger. 

You will (WILL) get back to regaining your identity and pieces of yourself (physically and mentally), no matter how far off that may feel right now. But instead of pushing through pain and dysfunction to do it, let's flip the narrative so that "getting your body back after having a baby" means instead to regain function, heal, and re-learn how your new body works in the post-baby world.

So here's a NEW list- instead of "drop pounds now" lists, here are 4 ways to REALLY get your body back!

1. Find a Physical Therapist

But not just any physical therapist- specifically, look for a physical therapist who specializes in women's health issues, sometimes called a "women's health PT" or a "pelvic floor PT." You should be able to get a referral from your OB, but sadly this is often not the case- so if you aren't finding that avenue helpful, then check out our RESOURCES page to find some directories. You'll quickly come to understand why this is standard care for postpartum women in many other countries, like France. 

2. Eat For Your Nutritional Needs

First and foremost, work closely with your healthcare provider! The point is, your needs are probably different than they were before having a baby, particularly if you are breastfeeding. Try this, this, and this article for a helpful starting point. Some cultures even believe you should consume certain foods to help with the healing process - try checking out The First Forty Days by Heng Ou for more on this. If you can afford it, find a nutritionist to help you on this path (find one on our RESOURCES page).

3. Core City

OK, everyone knows you aren't supposed to exercise prior to getting clearance from your doctor, but what about after? How much, and what, should you do? You should discuss this with your healthcare provider, but there are many programs out there specifically tailored to postpartum women. These programs vary but all are focused on helping postpartum women regain function in their core musculature, healing diastasis recti, and restoring pelvic floor function - all important aspects that should be functioning again before you start 'regular' exercise. Try Restore Your Core, Mutu System, or Hab It. (Know of other programs? Leave a suggestion in the comments.)

4. Self Care

Say what now? You've got a newborn and probably haven't showered in two days, and now you are supposed to worry about self care? Look, self care doesn't have to mean taking 30 minutes to do a face mask in your bathroom (although it can). Self care can be really simplified - sometimes, it's about taking 5 minutes to sit down and enjoy a cup of tea while flipping through a magazine without feeling guilty or worrying about all the other things you want to get done while the baby is napping. Maybe it means taking 5 minutes to journal in your Duo Diary, or maybe it means calling a friend. Get creative- a few minutes here and there of YOU TIME can go a long way. (Here's a great list to get you started). 

How did you help yourself heal after childbirth?

 

This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about med­i­cine, health and related sub­jects.  The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed physi­cian or other health care worker.

This post may contain affiliate links

5 Mommy Must-Do's After Having a Baby
 
Mommy must do's after baby
 

Here in the United States, we are enamored with pregnant women. There are salves, creams, workouts, massages, drinks, foods and a whole slew of other products all geared towards the pregnant woman. Pregnancy and a pregnant woman's self care is a $266.6 million dollar industry. As it should be. There should be a ton of products and services available to make a pregnant woman's life easier and more comfortable, because despite the images of glowing pregnant women we are fed in magazines and in the media, pregnancy can be really, really hard and uncomfortable.

And then. Then you have the baby.

And this all goes away.

It seems that in our society, when a woman has a baby, she is left a little bit to fend for herself. The next industry is all about baby- nursing pillows, nursing cookies, bottles, swings and other devices, but there really isn't an industry that is focused on a postpartum woman's self care. Sure, she gets a 6 week checkup, but that number is arbitrary and often is the ONLY stop on the self care train for a postpartum woman. 

This gap is one of the HUGE reasons why Duo Diary was created. A new mom shouldn't have to fend for herself after bringing a child into the world, whether through birth or adoption. Bringing home a baby is a massive upheaval physically and mentally. At Duo Diary, we aim to help this transition be a little bit easier by encouraging new moms to take care of themselves. We also recognize a few areas of care that can help a new mother immensely in those early weeks and months. In fact, a Duo Diary can be a great compliment to some of these services. 

The catch? These all cost money. A lot of money. And are not covered by most insurance. Which is why most moms -even those that can afford it - don't splurge on services like this. In our view, these should be a given, not a special treat for those that can afford it. (Heck, most new moms probably don't even know these things exist!). But the below services can really help a new mom get on the right track with her health. So if you are looking for a unique shower gift, consider gifting one of these services (along with, of course, a year's supply of Duo Diary!) 

1. A Postpartum Doula

Postpartum Doulas help new mothers with the transition into motherhood by supporting a new mother with things like breastfeeding, bonding with baby, help and guidance with the new baby, and many even offer light housekeeping and will run errands. You can find a postpartum doula in your area (if available) here

2. An IBCLC

Breastfeeding is really, really hard. It can be a massive struggle for many women, physically and emotionally. An International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLC) can help a new mom navigate this process by teaching them techniques, checking latches and looking for tongue ties or other potential issues, and providing support in helping a new mom succeed at breastfeeding. Find one here.

3. A PostPartum Exercise Program

A new mom has very specific changes that have occurred to her body that also need to be healed properly- jumping right into a 'regular' exercise program as soon as you get the clearance to exercise just isn't a good idea as it can exacerbate conditions that may have arisen during pregnancy and labor, and don't address the structural changes that occur to a woman's body. There are quite a few exercise programs out there that are geared specifically to postpartum women and healing issues like pelvic floor function and diastasis recti. Mutu System, Restore Your Core, The Tummy Team, Hab It, and Fit2B are all programs dedicated to helping a postpartum mom heal. You can contact these companies about purchasing a gift program for a new mom. 

4. Moms Groups

Moms groups can help with the transition into motherhood by giving a new mom a safe place where she can discuss concerns, experiences, learn, and connect with other women having the same shared experience. This is especially vital and helpful for new moms that don't live near family. Many moms groups are offered at your local 'pumping and feeding' store, churches, hospitals, schools, or other places. Here's a great article on what they entail and how to find one.

5. A Pelvic Floor Specialist

Let's get real, your pelvic floor takes a beating during pregnancy and labor, and it is also one of the most important structures for your daily function. News flash: leaking and peeing when you sneeze or exercise are NOT NORMAL and CAN BE FIXED. Easily. Enter the pelvic floor physical therapist. A pelvic floor physical therapist helps 'retrain' your pelvic floor to function properly and can often address issues that affect other areas (like your hips or diastasis). You can find one here, or refer to this article

What services do you wish you'd known about when you had a baby?

This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about med­i­cine, health and related sub­jects.  The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed physi­cian or other health care worker.

This post may contain affiliate links